Blog Updates

December 2nd, 2016
Model image from the Tangent Scale Models website.

Model image from the Tangent Scale Models website.

I hope all those who model the 1920s through the 1940s have heard about the recent Tangent Scale Models GATX tank car release. Two of the paint and lettering schemes follow early 1920s practices and a few car numbers are available in each of those decorated styles. A couple of these models should be hitting my doorway soon.

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Classic Seley Hoppers

November 25th, 2016

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Harold Oakhill has been busy with a fascinating project. He shares the following update.

I recently finished assembling the first two Delaware & Hudson Seley Hopper “kits” that have been produced with the help of Dave Campbell, Ray Breyer, and Aaron Gjermundson. These were displayed at the recent RPM Chicagoland meet in Lisle, Illinois.

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Pre-Depression Era Models at the RPM

November 10th, 2016
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Dick Scott’s O scale L&N 36-foot box car model.

I had a moment recently to take my time and review model images from the recent RPM Chicagoland meet. I found there were quite a few models representing prototypes built in the Teens and Twenties, but wearing later era paint and lettering. One of the prime examples leads off this blog post.

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Transporting Models

October 28th, 2016

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I recently attending the RPM Chicagoland prototype modeler meet in Lisle, IL. I had a great time attending presentations, meeting old friends, meeting people from email correspondence, and looking over the fine models on display. Several models traveled with me from El Paso and were on display at the event. Several people asked how I packed them away for air travel so here’s a look at what has worked for my travels.

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Masking Tape as a Weathering Tool

October 14th, 2016
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Masking tape has been applied to portions of the lettering on these freight cars before the weathering processes begin.

Several freight cars recently went through the weathering factory and each of them had some masking tape applied to protect part of the original paint coat or lettering. Model railroaders typically use masking tape in the process of applying large stripes or fancy paint schemes to locomotives or rolling stock. For these recent freight cars, the tape was applied to hint at changes made to the car. The tape became another tool in the weathering arsenal.

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